Muscadet, for now and forever.

July 17, 2013 § 1 Comment

ImageWhy forever? Because you can age it, dummy! Muscadet is briny, light and great with oysters. Yes. Sure. I get you. But there’s a lot more to the story. My column in the Portland Press Herald last week tells a small sliver of that story.

Gist: Great Muscadet is not to be trifled with. Set aside your oysters, and bring on the main course, even if the main course includes hearty fish, cockles and clams, sausage. And one of the greats of the greats is Guy Bossard. Bossard is a legend in the Loire for his low-tech, all-natural approach. Now that he’s in his 60s and looking to the future, has hired a protégé, Fred Niger, and the winery is now called Domaine de L’Écu.

Whatever you call ’em, the wines are extraordinary now, but will gain tremendous complexity over the next 3-10 years at least. It’s a bargain investment: $19 for a bottle of wine that already offers much of what good Chablis does, and over time will offer even more.

Summer wines for when you’re feeling wintry

July 25, 2012 § Leave a comment

People have already asking me if I’m feeling OK. Maybe I laid it on a little thick at the start of my Portland Press Herald wine column today, but I was just being honest. Everyone asks how your summer’s going and if you don’t grin and say “Great!”, then somehow you’ve given the wrong answer. Summer’s great, but it can be a bit stressful as the schedule and routine explode, and you’re stuck at work when you should be at the beach.

Anyway, I’ve found a couple of thrilling wines lately to cure my summertime blues: a Muscadet with 30 months of lees-aging that tastes much grander than most Muscadet I know, and a simple roble from Jumilla (majority Monastrell) that just makes me smile. Which is often more than enough.

Rock on: Headrick Loire wines and the primacy of place

March 21, 2012 § Leave a comment

I’ve never really heard or read anyone speak eloquently about what “minerality” in wines actually is. I know I have a hard time translating into language that sense of stones in the glass. Wines from the Loire make me try harder than any other wine, though (with the one obvious exception of Mosel Riesling). From flinty Sancerre to sawtooth Vouvray, the Loire valley’s unique terroir (the geologic beneficiary of the 7.32 trillion oysters who have given their lives to its bedrock over the millennia) imbues rocks with poetry.

This week in the Portland Press Herald, I give thanks to the Loire, and specifically to Jon David Headrick, a Loire specialist who imports stunning Savennières and Cheverny, but also scintillating “everyday” Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Muscadet and Gamay that are joyful at the simplest of tables but hold their own at the most elegant. Jon David is on our side: the side of the small guys over the big, of the interesting over the stupid, of finesse over blast. You know: us quiet soldiers.

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